Categories
Fly Cars Review Fly Reviews

Ford Ride & Drive: Why The New Orleans African American Museum Is An Important Staple of NOLA And Should Not Be Ignored

The 2019 Ford Media Ride & Drive during 25th Anniversary of the Essence Festival was in full force this year yet again! Running with this year’s theme “Paint the Future Proud”, the well-known motor company spotlighted visual artists Shantell Martin, Sydney G. James and Melissa Mitchell. Art installations were displayed all weekend to showcase their work, while test drives
were being offered of Ford’s current vehicle lineup; paired with panel discussions and giveaways also featured, plus so much more.

During the Ford Media Ride & Drive, journalists, influencers and more got a chance to attend a special brunch (prepared by Chef Gary Netter, Culinary Ambassador of New Orleans) at The New Orleans African American Museum of Art, History and Culture powered by Ford. Attendees received a special tour of the museum which was founded in 1996 under the guidance and extensive support of the City of New Orleans Department of Housing and Neighborhood Development.

Courtesy of NOAAM

The tour led by Gia A. Hamilton, Executive Director & Chief Curator of NOAAM, gave an extensive background story and history of the land which is located in the Tremé section of New Orleans, a neighborhood that was home to the nation’s largest, most prosperous and politically progressive community of Black people by the mid-1850s.

More about NOAAM:

In the 18th century, the land was occupied by the Morand Plantation and brickyard, which was later acquired by hat maker and real estate developer Claude Tremé. In 1810, Tremé sold the land to the city of New Orleans, and it became home to many free persons of color. Congo Square, was a gathering place for free persons and slaves to gather, play music, and sell goods.

Tremé is unique in its architecture, it’s streets are a gumbo of double shotgun houses, Creole cottages and townhouses. An excellent example of Creole architecture is the Meilleur-Goldthwaire House, a villa built in 1828 which makes up part of the NOAAM campus. The New Orleans African American Museum is situated near the St. Augustine Church, one of the oldest African-American Catholic parishes in the nation, and two other museums that center black culture and contribution: the Backstreet Cultural Museum and Tremé’s Petit Jazz Museum.

On site, local artists also display their work showcasing the importance of the NOLA’s heritage and what it means to them, with an addition of political and racism issues that is going on to this very day.

Visiting NOAAM was the perfect segue way into learning about the progression within their community and how someone like the media, and more could be involved. The work starts in your own communities first, and just simply should not be ignored. Invest. Create. Lead By Example. Stand for what your ancestors stood for. Fight for what they fought for.

Thanks to Ford for staying on top of what’s important to the culture! New Orleans is so rich in history and culture, so this was a very much-needed visit and collaboration during this year’s 2019 Essence Festival.

If you’re ever in NOLA, please be sure to stop by!

Be sure to visit their website at http://www.noaam.org.
Contact: info@noaam.org

More pics below!

Photos by Gabriel Williams & Nigel Degaff

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Categories
Fashion FLY Events

Fly Events: Essence’s 2018 ‘Street Style Festival’

Thousands of fashionistas and style influencers converged at Duggal Greenhouse in Brooklyn for the return of the 2018 ESSENCE Street Style Festival—the non-stop celebration highlighting style, culture and community. Hosted by Insecure star and comedienne Amanda Seales, attendees enjoyed a variety of experiences, including an awards ceremony honoring songstress/style maven Kelis and fashion influencer Kellie Brown for their impact and legacy in the fashion world. The celebration featured curated conversations with Dapper Dan, Tristan Wilds and Trevor Jackson along with exciting performances from songstress/dancer/model/actress Teyana Taylor, Afropop sensation Yemi Alade and DJ’s Jasmine Solano and Olivia Dope.

The new indoor/outdoor format also allowed the crowd to enjoy a variety of curated experiences, including: a robust vendor marketplace showcasing more African-American entrepreneurs than ever before (including vendors from ESSENCE Marché, the new digital beauty, fashion and lifestyle e-commerce destination for Black women); a fun-filled Kidzone; a Street Style fashion show showcasing a host of the local fashionistas who bring the hottest looks from the catwalk to life on the city sidewalks every day; delicious eats and refreshing beverages; and so much more.

Launched in 2014, the ESSENCE Street Style Festival was created to provide a space where the fashion elite, style influencers, and everyday fashionistas can come to celebrate the unique influence Black women have on all facets of fashion, style and beauty during NYFW.

Sponsors for the 2018 event include: Coca-Cola, Macy’s, Nike and Shea Moisture. For more details, visit www.essence.com/streetstyle2018.

Photos Courtesy of Essence from Getty Images

More photos below:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Categories
Entertainment

Watch: Migos Freestyle On Sway In The Morning and Gets A Surprise Appearance From Laurence Fishburne

[ione_embed src=https://www.youtube.com/embed/UGF5XUI39Og service=youtube width=854 height=480 type=iframe]

Migos stops by Sway In The Morning on the brink of their new album release Culture. The trio speaks with Sway Calloway as the industry vet gave them props for leading the new rap culture, and sticking together for so many years.

Since their mentioned by Atlanta‘s Donald Glover aka Childish Gambino at the 2017 Golden Globes during his win, Migos’ “Bad And Boujee” charted at #1 on Billboard Hot 100 spot with a 240% spike in sales, literally within 24-48 hours.

During the interview, Quavo, Takeoff and Offset capped off a freestyle with only later being surprised by legendary actor Laurence Fishburne.

Check it out above.

To add, a petition has been raised for Migos to replace Lady Gaga at the 2017 Super Bowl Halftime show.

In addition to the replacement, the request also states that the Preshow should include Rae Sremmurd, Gucci, Goodie Mob, Ludacris and Young Jeezy, Young Thug needs to sing “Guwop Home”, the official anthem of Atlanta, Andre 3000 should sing the national anthem with Erykah Badu. By sing, they mean hit Donald Trump with a FIRE 64 bars. Lastly, the halftime should be Migos killing “Bad and Boujee,” Future with “March Madness”, then Outkast comes out and does an AQUEMINI sampler and then they end it with Bun B and Jay Z doing “Big Pimpin.”

Thoughts?

 

Categories
Fashion

Lupita Nyong’o Stands Boldly In Kenya On The Cover of Vogue

lupita-nyongo-vogue

In all of her melanin, the beautiful and talented Lupita Nyong’o graces the cover of Vogue right in her homeland of Kenya photographed by Mario Testino.

screen-shot-2016-09-16-at-1-29-52-pm

As the official shoot is based off of bold colors, glorious prints and majestical looks, Lupita wears fashionable and culturally inspired pieces by Roberto Cavalli, Chloé, Christian Louboutin, Phillip Lim, Duro Olowu, Zac Posen, Akris and more.

Above, pictures a joyous moment with her parents (left): father, Senator Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o, who represents the country of Kisumu, and her mother, Dorothy Nyong’o, the Managing Director of the African Cancer Foundation. To the right, Lupita sits with her paternal 96-year-old grandmother, Dorca who built a dormitory for orphaned and disadvantaged schoolgirls.

screen-shot-2016-09-16-at-1-29-30-pm

During the exclusive interview, Lupita says:

“There are certain cards that have been dealt me that I take on. I want to create opportunities for other people of color because I’m fortunate enough to have a platform to do that. That is why Eclipsed and even Queen of Katwe are so important, to change the narrative, offer a new lens on African identity.”

About her skin color vs. the industry vs. growing up:

“The European sense of beauty affects us all. I came home from college in the early two-thousands and saw ads on TV with a girl who can’t get a job. She uses this product. She gets her skin lighter. She gets the job. The lording of lighter skin is a common thing growing up in Nairobi. Being called ‘black mamba.’ The slow burn of recognizing something else is better than you.”

Read more of her interview HERE.

Photo Credit: Mario Testino for Vogue Magazine

More pictures below:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.